Sixteen affordable Calgary communities for river living

While waterfront real estate will always come at a premium, it’s possible to enjoy life near the river in several Calgary communities at a much more reasonable price. Here’s a selection of Calgary riverside communities with a year-to-date (YTD) benchmark price lower than the YTD citywide benchmark price of $423,300.

Bow River

Bowness
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $316,775
Residential average price (YTD): $410,889
New listings (YTD): 191
Number of residential sales (YTD): 100

Point McKay
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $352,550
Residential average price (YTD): $391,175
New listings (YTD): 52
Number of residential sales (YTD): 26

Spruce Cliff
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $402,075
Residential average price (YTD): $410,013
New listings (YTD): 132
Number of residential sales (YTD): 40

Sunalta
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $309,313
Residential average price (YTD): $291,468
New listings (YTD): 67
Number of residential sales (YTD): 22

Downtown West End
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $408,300
Residential average price (YTD): $338,226
New listings (YTD): 103
Number of residential sales (YTD): 38

Chinatown
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $296,725
Residential average price (YTD): $335,795
New listings (YTD): 63
Number of residential sales (YTD): 33

Downtown East Village
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $370,263
Residential average price (YTD): $351,926
New listings (YTD): 124
Number of residential sales (YTD): 32

Ogden
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $319,588
Residential average price (YTD): $310,715
New listings (YTD): 87
Number of residential sales (YTD): 58

Riverbend
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $390,113
Residential average price (YTD): $414,832
New listings (YTD): 125
Number of residential sales (YTD): 74

Deer Run
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $384,313
Residential average price (YTD): $397,738
New listings (YTD): 57
Number of residential sales (YTD): 45

Elbow River

Beltline
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $246,725
Residential average price (YTD): $316,831
New listings (YTD): 640
Number of residential sales (YTD): 260

Erlton
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $395,350
Residential average price (YTD): $510,131
New listings (YTD): 52
Number of residential sales (YTD): 18

Mission
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $234,075
Residential average price (YTD): $343,554
New listings (YTD): 135
Number of residential sales (YTD): 76

Cliff Bungalow
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $382,188
Residential average price (YTD): $438,563
New listings (YTD): 55
Number of residential sales (YTD): 24

Rideau Park
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $287,138
Residential average price (YTD): $530,829
New listings (YTD): 31
Number of residential sales (YTD): 12

Windsor Park
Residential benchmark price (YTD): $347,913
Residential average price (YTD): $367,518
New listings (YTD): 115
Number of residential sales (YTD): 39

SOURCE: CREB®. All stats are accurate through August 2019

By

Tyler Difley

Job market weakness and lending restrictions a common thread in 2018’s housing market

As oversupply continues in Calgary’s housing market, December prices eased by one per cent compared to last month and are over three per cent below last December.

“Persistent weakness in the job market and changes in the lending market impacted sales activity in the resale market this year,” said CREB® chief economist Ann-Marie Lurie.

“This contributed to elevated supply in the resale market, resulting in price declines.”

December sales totalled 794 units, a 21 per cent decline over the previous year. Overall year-to-date sales in the city totalled 16,144 units. This is a 14 per cent decline over 2017 and nearly 20 per cent below long-term averages.

Inventory levels in December sat at 4,904 units. This is well above levels recorded last year and 30 per cent above typical levels for the month. Elevated resale inventories in 2018 were caused by gains in the detached and attached sectors.

Throughout 2018, the months of supply remained elevated and averaged 5.2 months. This contributed to the annual average benchmark price decline of 1.5 per cent. Price declines occurred across all product types and have caused citywide figures to remain over nine per cent below the monthly highs recorded in 2014.

“Both buyers and sellers faced adjustments in expectations this year. Sellers had to compete with more choice in the resale market, but also the new-home market,” said CREB® president Tom Westcott.

“With less people looking for a home, it became a choice between delaying when to sell or adjusting the sale price. However, buyers looking for more affordable product did not find the same price adjustments that existed in some of the higher price ranges.”

More information on the 2018 housing market will be released at CREB®’s 2019 Forecast Conference & Tradeshow (www.crebforecast.com) on Jan. 30, 2019.

HOUSING MARKET FACTS

Detached

  • Detached sales declined across all districts in 2018. With citywide sales of 9,945 units, activity remains 21 per cent below typical levels for the year.
  • Detached inventories were higher than last year’s levels for each month of the year, including December. Slow sales caused the market to be oversupplied through most of 2018.
  • Detached benchmark prices totalled $481,400 in December, a one per cent decline over last month and a three per cent decline over last year. Overall, 2018 prices declined by 1.5 per cent compared to last year.
  • Prices have eased across most districts in 2018. The largest declines this year have occurred in the North East, North West and North districts.

Apartment

  • Apartment sales totalled 2,663 units in 2018. While the decline is less than other product types, levels are 22 per cent below long-term averages.
  • The apartment condominium sector has struggled with oversupply for almost three years and 2018 was no exception.
  • However, supply has been easing, as inventories this year averaged 1,584 units, one per cent below last year’s levels.
  • Despite slowing supply growth, the market remained oversupplied, causing further price declines. In December, benchmark prices were $251,500, over two per cent below last year. Annually, prices have declined by nearly three per cent for a total decline of 14 per cent since 2014.
  • Price declines this year have ranged from a high of nearly six per cent in the East district to a low of two per cent in both the City Centre and North West districts.

Attached

  • Declines for both row and semi-detached product resulted in 2018 attached sales of 3,536 units, a 15 per cent decline over the previous year and 14 per cent below long-term averages.
  • Slower sales activity prompted some pull-back in new listings, but this was limited to the row sector. Row new listings declined by four per cent and semi-detached new listings rose by nearly 15 per cent in 2018.
  • Despite some adjustments to new listings, inventory levels remained elevated, keeping the market in buyers’ market territory and putting downward pressure on prices.
  • In December, the semi-detached benchmark price totalled $397,500. This is a monthly and year-over-year decline of 0.8 and 3.8 per cent, respectively. Recent price declines have caused this sector to erase any of the gains that occurred last year, as 2018 prices remain just below 2017 levels. Overall, annual prices remain 1.4 per cent below 2014 peak levels.
  • Row prices have also been edging down. As of December, row prices were $288,400, a 1.5 per cent decline from last month and nearly four per cent below last year’s levels. Overall, 2018 prices remain two per cent below last year’s levels and nearly 10 per cent below previous highs.

REGIONAL MARKET FACTS

Airdrie

  • In 2018, the Airdrie housing market was distinctly marked by oversupply and signs of buyers’ market conditions. Compared to last year, inventory levels and months of supply have been significantly higher, combined with lower levels of sales. This has led to downward pressures on the benchmark price for detached homes.
  • Annual residential sales exhibited a year-over-year decline of 14 per cent and were almost 19 per cent lower than activity over the past 5 years. This consistent decline was observed across all product types.
  • Supply in 2018 was at record-high levels, with new listings achieving a new year-to-date peak for most of the year. Inventories have also been continuously increasing throughout this year and are 12 per cent higher than in 2017. Months of supply have increased steadily and averaged 5.6 months in 2018.
  • Persistent oversupply has resulted in a decline in Airdrie prices.  In 2018 detached benchmark prices averaged $369,042, over two percent below last year

Cochrane

  • Declining by 64 units, 2018 sales in Cochrane were lower than the previous year. However, an annual count of 599 sales remains comparable to activity over the past three years.
  • In 2018 there were 1,288 new listings, the highest on record.  Elevated new listings and easing sales resulted in rising inventories and months of supply that averaged nearly 7 months.
  • Elevated supply has caused detached prices to trend down over the second half of the year, however, it was not enough to offset earlier gains.  In 2018, detached benchmark prices have remained comparable to last year.

Okotoks

  • 2018 residential sales in Okotoks were 463 units, a decline over last year and comparable to 2010 activity.
  • Gains in new listings combined with slower sales resulted in rising inventory and excess supply in this market.
  • Despite increased supply and weak sales, detached home prices in Okotoks showed modest increases in 2018. The average detached benchmark price totalled $434,875, which is one per cent higher than last year.
By

crebnow

Four common renovation nightmares and how to avoid them

Making sure your dream renovation doesn’t turn into a nightmare means doing some due diligence before signing on the dotted line.

Many potential problems can be avoided by simply choosing the right contractor to tackle your renovation project, says Danny Ritchie, president and co-owner of Ultimate Homes & Renovations.

“People need to do their homework a little bit more on the credibility and background of the company,” said Ritchie. “How long they’ve been in business, what their track record is, how much subcontracting they do.”

Here are four renovation nightmares you might encounter and, more importantly, how to avoid them:

1. Contractor takes a deposit then disappears
Consumer groups warn about smooth-talking, door-to-door contractors who offer to repair a roof or renovate a bathroom, accept a deposit and then are never heard from again.

Ritchie says people should never decide who to hire because “they like the salesman.”
He says get a business card, check them out first and then decide if it’s a good idea to hire someone who knocked on your door.

2. Costly “extras” start adding up
The price you are quoted is only useful if it spells out exactly what’s included. Otherwise, you might find yourself charged more during construction to get the renovation you actually wanted.

Ritchie says for a major renovation project, his company often provides the homeowner with a “scope of work” that includes 20 pages of specifications on the materials included, so there are no surprises.

“Even to the point of saying how many pot lights will be put into a kitchen, and not just (an amount) for electrical,” he said.

3. Renovation is taking forever
Ritchie says a disreputable renovator might tell a person “what they want to hear” when it comes to how long a project will take, regardless of whether that timeframe is realistic or not

“Quite often, I’ll tell a customer that it’s going to take three or four months to do this job, and they’ll turn around and tell me, ‘the other guy said he can do it in three to six
weeks,’ ” he said.

He adds a typical kitchen renovation takes two to three months – not two to three weeks – so be wary of anyone who promises such a tight turnaround.

4. Renovator doesn’t back up their workmanship
After a renovation is complete, there are bound to be a few things that might need a follow-up visit to fix or touch up, so a contractor who doesn’t respond will leave the homeowner in the lurch.

Ritchie says being a member of the RenoMark program is a good indicator that a company stands behind its workmanship, since the program’s code of conduct requires companies to offer at least a two-year warranty on a renovation.

By

Gerald Vander Pyl

Market Forecast Report

The forecast report provides a comprehensive look at key economic indicators that influence housing within CREB®’s region boundaries, from energy prices to employment and population trends, to name a few.

It also examines each market sector, explores housing by property type and clarifies how supply and demand is functioning at the district level.

To learn more and view CREB®’s latest forecast report, please click here.